Dance@TheGrange

 

June | 25, 26

 

‘Iconic classical and modern ballet alongside incredible contemporary dance’

 

Following the success of the first Dance@TheGrange in 2018, Director of Dance and Royal Ballet’s resident choreographer Wayne McGregor returns with two nights of ballet and contemporary dance  in the majestic atmosphere of the Grange Estate in Hampshire.

The programme will include two new commissions by emerging choreographers Mthuthuzeli November and Alice Topp supported by the Dance@TheGrange New Commission Fund. The evening which is produced by Studio Wayne McGregor features Company Wayne McGregor with Alessandra Ferri as well as Ballet Black who are making their Festival debut.

Outlier

Overview

After celebrating its 25th year in 2018, Company Wayne McGregor will be performing a new restaging of Wayne McGregor’s critically acclaimed  work  Outlier.  Set  to  Thomas  Adès’  2005  violin concerto Concentric Paths, Outlier is inspired by the Bauhaus movement’s notions of minimalism and colour theory. McGregor has made over 30 works for the company, which tours his most experimental and ambitious new choreography across the UK and around the world. Company Wayne McGregor is Resident Company of Sadler’s Wells, and is part of Studio Wayne McGregor, the creative engine for all McGregor’s work.

Outlier will feature an exclusive performance by prima ballerina Alessandra Ferri, former principal dancer at the Royal Ballet and winner of the Olivier Award for Outstanding Achievement in Dance. For this performance only, Ferri will breathe in her famously free, sensual, and emotionally electrifying technique into McGregor’s work at the elegant 600-seat theatre at The Grange.

Production Team
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Wayne McGregor CBE

Director of Dance@TheGrange / Founder & Artistic Director of Studio Wayne McGregor, Choreographer

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Thomas Adès

Music

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Lucy Carter

Lighting & Set Design

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Moritz Junge

Costume Design

Wayne McGregor  CBE is a multi award  winning British choreographer and director, internationally renowned for  trailblazing innovations  in performance that have radically redefined dance for over twenty-five years.

Wayne McGregor is Artistic Director of Studio Wayne McGregor, the creative engine of his life-long choreographic enquiry into thinking through and with the body. It encompasses his own touring company of dancers, Company Wayne McGregor; creative collaborations across dance, film, music, visual art, technology and science; and highly specialized learning, engagement and research programmes. The first arts organization to be based on Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, Studio Wayne McGregor is a shared space for making where the creative brains of the day can exchange knowledge and invent together.

McGregor is also Resident Choreographer at The Royal Ballet, where his productions are acclaimed for their daring reconfiguring of classical language. McGregor is the first and only Resident Choreographer from a contemporary background. He is also regularly commissioned by and has works in the repertories of the most important ballet companies in the world, including Paris Opera Ballet, Munich Ballet, New York City Ballet, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Bolshoi Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, NDT 1, Australian Ballet, Hong Kong Ballet, Royal Danish Ballet and San Francisco Ballet.

He is in demand as a choreographer for theatre (Old Vic, NT, Royal Court, Donmar) opera (La Scala/Royal Opera, ENO), film (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Tarzan, Fantastic Beasts 1 & 2, Sing, Mary Queen of Scots), music videos (Radiohead, The Chemical Brothers), fashion shows (Gareth Pugh at London Fashion Week 2017), campaigns (everyBODY for Selfridges) and TV (The 2016 Brit Awards Opening Sequence, Paloma Faith’s Brit Awards performance 2015).

McGregor is Professor of Choreography at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, has an Honorary Doctor of Science from Plymouth University, an Honorary Doctor of Letters from University of Leeds, and is part of the Circle of Cultural Fellows at King’s College London.

McGregor’s work has earned him a multitude of awards including four Critics’ Circle National Dance Awards, two Time Out Awards, two South Bank Show Awards, two Olivier Awards, a prix Benois de la Danse and two Golden Mask Awards. In 2011 McGregor was awarded a CBE for Services to Dance.

English composer, conductor and pianist Thomas Adès was born in London and studied at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama and King’s College, Cambridge. His first opera Powder her Face (1995) has been performed more than two hundred times worldwide.

Adès made his Royal Opera debut in 2004 conducting the world premiere of his second opera The Tempest. He has since returned to Covent Garden conduct The Rake’s Progress, a revival of The Tempest in 2007 and in 2017 his third opera, The Exterminating Angel, a co-commission between The Royal Opera, Salzburg Festival and the Metropolitan Opera, New York. His second opera, Powder her Face was performed at the ROH in 2008.

The Tempest has been seen in Strasbourg, Copenhagen, Sante Fe, Toronto, Frankfurt, Budapest, Luebeck and New York. The Metropolitan Opera’s recording of the opera with Deutsche Grammophon won the 2014 Grammy Award for Best Opera Recording. His most performed orchestral work, Asyla, was commissioned by the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra under Simon Rattle. Other works include America (New York Philharmonic), Polaris (New World Symphony) and Totentanz (BBC Symphony Orchestra, BBC Proms). Much of his music has been choreographed for ballet.

Adès was Music Director of Birmingham Contemporary Music Group 1998–2000, Artistic Director of Aldeburgh Festival 1999–2008, and in September 2016 becomes Boston Symphony Orchestra’s first Artistic Partner. He regularly conducts for orchestras such as the Los Angeles Philharmonic, London Symphony Orchestra and Royal Concertgebouw, and there have been many international festivals dedicated to his music. Appearances as a pianist include recitals at Carnegie Hall and the Barbican. His many awards include the 2015 Sonning Prize and the 2000 Grawemeyer Award. He coaches piano and chamber music annually at the International Musicians Seminar.

Lucy Carter is a multi-award winning, critically acclaimed Lighting Designer. She was awarded the 2018 Critics Circle National Dance Award for Outstanding Contribution to Dance. She is a two-time winner of the prestigious Knight of Illumination Award for Dance for Chroma (2008) and for Woolf Works (2015) both by choreographer and director Wayne McGregor CBE for The Royal Ballet; winner of the 2013 TMA Achievement award in Opera for Lohengrin; and the 2004 Olivier Dance Award for 2 Human (McGregor).

Opera credits includes Katya Kabanova and Hansel and Gretel (The Royal Opera House), Werther (Bergen National Opera), Elektra (Goteborge Opera), Lohengrin (Greek National Opera, Polish National Opera, and Welsh National Opera), La finta giardiniera (Glyndebourne and Teatro alla Scala), Peter Grimes on Aldeburgh beach, Salomé and The Dream of Gerontius for ENO at The Royal Festival Hall.

Dance credits include Woolf Works, Obsidian Tear, +/- Human, AfteRite, Yugen, Multiverse, Atomos and Autobiography with long-term collaborator Wayne McGregor; Threshold (Le Patin Libre), Infra (Australian Ballet), The Most Incredible Thing (Charlotte Ballet). Theatre credits include The Almighty Sometimes and Persuasion (Royal Exchange), Home I’m Darling (NT and West End), Husbands and Sons, Medea and Emil and the Detectives (NT), Everybody’s Talking About Jamie (Apollo), Oil (Almeida) The End of Longing (Playhouse).

Other credits include: lighting design for Gareth Pugh’s Women’s Collection in London Fashion Week 2017 and Paloma Faith’s performance at the Brit Awards 2015 (choreographed by McGregor).

Costume designer Moritz Junge was born in Germany and studied at the Berlin University of the Arts and the Slade School of Fine Art. He won the Linbury Prize for stage design in 2001. Costume designs for ballet include McGregor’s Anatomie de la Sensation (Paris Opera Ballet), Dyad 1929 (Australian Ballet), Outlier (New York City Ballet), Kairos (Ballett Zürich) and Sunyata (Bayerisches Staatsballett, Munich).

Junge collaborates regularly Wayne McGregor, at The ROH on Chroma (2006), Infra (2008), Limen (2009), Live Fire Exercise (2011), Woolf Works (2015) and Multiverse (2016) for The Royal Ballet, and with Company Wayne McGregor on FAR, Atomos, Future Self, Azimuth, and Rain Room. Junge made his ROH debut in 2004 creating costume designs for the world premiere of Adès’s The Tempest. Credits since include Aida (2010) and Les Troyens (2012), directed by David McVicar, for The Royal Opera.

In theatre his work includes The Kitchen, Dido, Queen of Carthage and The Hour We Knew Nothing of Each Other (National Theatre) and All About My Mother (Old Vic). Opera work includes La Cenerentola (Glyndebourne Festival and Deutsche Oper Berlin), King Roger (Mainz), The Winter’s Tale and The Messiah (ENO), Un ballo in maschera and Adriana Lecouvreur (Freiburg), Rigoletto (Hanover), Die Zauberflöte (Lucerne), Macbeth (Konzert Theater Bern) and Béatrice et Bénédict (Theater an der Wien).

Junge’s other credits including designing the costumes for the London 2012 Paralympic Games Opening Ceremony.

Recent costume work includes: Pure Dance (Sadler’s Wells); Songs of Bukovina (American Ballet Theatre), Sunyata (Munich Staatsballet), L’Anatomie de la sensation (Paris Opera Ballet), Outlier (NYCB), Dyad 1929 (Australian Ballet). For the Royal Ballet, costume work includes Woolf Works, Multiverse, Live Fire Exercise, Limen, Infra and Chroma.

Work in opera includes set and costumes for Three Oranges (Staatstheater Mainz), Così fan tutte (Opera Australia), Powder Her Face (Theater Aachen); and costumes for Norma, Roberto Devereux, Cavalleria rusticana/Pagliacci (Metropolitan Opera, New York), Les Troyens (Royal Opera, San Francisco, Vienna).

Designs for theatre include Dance Nation, Judgment Day (Almeida), Aristocrats (Donmar), Macbeth, The Kitchen, Dido, Queen of Carthage (NT), A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Shakespeare’s Globe), In the Republic of Happiness (Royal Court), All About my Mother (Old Vic). He was an overall winner of the Linbury Prize for Stage Design.

Cast
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Alessandra Ferri

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Company Wayne McGregor

Italian dancer Alessandra Ferri is a former Principal of The Royal Ballet. Ferri was born in Milan and trained first at La Scala Ballet School, Milan, followed by The Royal Ballet School. She entered The Royal Ballet in 1980, promoted to Soloist in 1983 and to Principal in 1984 aged 19. She left the company in 1985, returning in 2003 to dance Juliet (Romeo and Juliet) as a Guest Artist. She returned in 2015 as a Guest Artist to create a role in Wayne McGregor’s Woolf Works for The Royal Ballet, for which she was awarded the Critics’ Circle National Dance Award for Best Female Dancer and a second Olivier Award for Outstanding Achievement in Dance. She performed in The Royal Ballet’s revival of Woolf Works at the Royal Opera House in 2017. With The Royal Ballet, she has performed key roles in Mayerling, Manon, L’Invitation au voyage, Valley of Shadows and Different Drummer. In 1985 she joined American Ballet Theatre on the invitation of Mikhail Baryshnikov and went on to form a famed dance partnership with Julio Bocca. She joined La Scala Ballet, Milan, as a guest principal in 1992, remaining with ABT as a guest principal. Ferri starred in AfteRite, Wayne McGregor’s first commission for American Ballet Theatre in 2018, based on Stravinsky’s ‘The Rite of Spring’, and in 2019 she performed the lead role of La Scala Ballet’s re-staging of Woolf Works. Other works with Wayne McGregor include Witness with Herman Cornejo, the Boots No.7 campaign in 2016, and a performance in McGregor’s 2018 BBC film Winged Bull in the Elephant Case filmed at the National Gallery, London.

Company Wayne McGregor is McGregor’s ensemble of highly skilled dancers. Founded in 1993, this was the original instrument through which McGregor evolved his distinctive visual style, revealing the movement possibilities of the body in ever more precise degrees of articulation. McGregor has made over thirty works for the company and today it continues to be his laboratory for ambitious and experimental new choreography, touring his work across the UK and around the world. Company Wayne McGregor is Resident Company at Sadler’s Wells, and is based at Studio Wayne McGregor on Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, London.

Synopsis
OUTLIER

‘In 2010 I was asked to create a new work for the New York City Ballet in their architecture and dance series. The Philip Johnson building that houses the David H. Koch Theatre and is home to the New York City Ballet felt like a natural place to look for inspiration. Johnson was not only a great friend of George Balanchine and an influential architect, he championed the architects of the Bauhaus, like Walter Gropius and Mies van der Rohe, in the U.S.I am fascinated by that Bauhaus art period and by abstract minimalist painters like Josef Albers and Barnett Newman. The visual context for the piece has been greatly informed by the minimalist’s notion of simplicity and colour theory.’ – Wayne McGregor CBE

 

Premiere: 14 May 2010, New York City Ballet, David H. Koch Theater, Lincoln Centre for the Performing Arts, New York, USA

The Suit

Overview

Dance@TheGrange will also welcome Cassa Pancho’s Ballet Black for the first time, who will perform Cathy Marston’s narrative ballet The Suit. Comprised of international dancers of black and Asian descent, Ballet Black was founded in 2001 by Pancho to diversify ballet through its constantly growing repertoire of over 45 originally commissioned ballets. Inspired by South African writer Can Themba’s short story of the same name, The Suit follows in Marston’s unique tradition of interpreting great literature into dance by stripping classic works to their core and re-imagining them for new audiences through classic and contemporary expression.

 

 

Production Team
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Cathy Marston

Choreography

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David Plater

Lighting Design

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Jane Heather

Design

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Edward Kemp

Dramaturg

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Philip Feeney

Music

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The Kronos Quartet

Music

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Cassa Pancho MBE

Ballet Black, Founder and Artistic Director

Cathy Marston is a choreographer, artistic director, Clore Cultural Leadership Fellow and Governor of The Place (London). After education in Cambridge, she spent two years at the Royal Ballet School, before launching a successful international career now spanning over twenty years. Cathy’s great gift is to join artistic dots, creating form for stories, emotions and ideas. She inherited a passion for literature from her English-teacher parents. For Cathy, stories inform dance.

As Associate Artist of the Royal Opera House for five years, she created a critically acclaimed interpretation of Ibsen’s Ghosts. During her six year tenure in Switzerland directing the Bern Ballett, her British ‘respect for the playwright’ became influenced by the ideas of German theatre and ‘Director’s Theatre’, resulting in her unique, hybrid signature. Lending new perspectives to old narratives in her version of Bronte’s Jane Eyre, Chekov’s Three Sisters, Narbokov’s Lolita, or in her historically-inspired Witch-hunt: all are danced-stories stripped back to their essence and displaying high quality technique and unflinching expressive integrity.

Passionate about opening original ideas to new audiences, Cathy crafts unexpected matches between classical and contemporary art forms. Commissioning a new score for soprano voice and female beatboxer is an instance where she happily combined her artistic vision with practical prowess – a great personal achievement for Cathy.

Cathy’s proudest moments include launching her charitable company, The Cathy Marston Project, rescuing Bern Ballett from threatened closure, as well as major creations for Danza Contemporanea de Cuba, Finnish National Ballet and Northern Ballet (and many more). With future collaborations planned in opera and theatre, further widening her portfolio of over fifty works performed in eleven countries, Cathy looks forward to continuing to charter new territory – both geographically and artistically.

David trained at RADA and was previously Head of Lighting at the Donmar Warehouse. He has been resident lighting designer for Ballet Black since 2001 lighting over forty dance commissions at the Linbury Theatre, Royal Opera House and Barbican, as well as all over the UK, Holland, Germany, Italy and Bermuda. David’s nominations for lighting design include: an Olivier, Tony and Drama Desk for Best Lighting Design for Bring Up The Bodies in Winter Gardens Broadway & Aldwych West End; a Knight of Illumination Award for Richard II (Best Lighting in a Play in 2012) and for This Is My Family (Best Lighting for a Musical) in 2013.  His designs include: The Mother (for Arthur Pita) The Mentalists, Wyndhams, The Effect, Sheffield Theatres, Terra, The Cocktail Party, Terra, Deathwatch, Lovely Sunday and Outside Blixen at the Coronet Notting Hill, Bring Up The Bodies Winter Garden Theatre, New York, Aldwych and RSC Swan. This Is My Family Sheffield Lyceum, Outside Mullingar Bath Ustinov, Brass Leeds City Varieties, The Glass Supper Hampstead, Billy Liar Manchester Royal Exchange, The Dishwashers Birmingham Rep. Richard III/Twelfth Night, Roger Rees: What You Will, 13 The MusicalJason Robert Brown in Concert, (all at the Apollo, West End). Further work includes: Sondheim at 80 Queens West End, Michael Ball in Concert Haymarket West End. Dark Tales, Beautiful Thing Arts West End, Richard IIFour Quartets and Three Days of Rain, for the Donmar Warehouse, Loyal Women Royal Court Theatre, Macbeth Sheffield Crucible, Quiz Show Traverse Theatre, Mrs Lowry & Son, The Silence of the Sea, Stacy/Fanny & Faggot , for the Trafalgar Studios, The Chair Plays, Lyric Hammersmith,  Arab Israeli Cookbook, Tricycle Theatre, When We Are Married  and A Passionate Woman at the York Theatre Royal, Dick Whittington, Beauty & The Beast, Robin Hood and Sinbad the Sailor for Theatre Royal Stratford East, and My Night with Reg and Dancing at Lughnasa for the New Vic Theatre in Stoke. In 2018, David was the recipient of the Knight of Illumination Award for Dance for his designs for The Suit (Cathy Marston/Ballet Black). davidrobertplater.com

The Suit is Jane Heather’s first design for ballet but characteristic of her essential design style which uses a minimal visual language to evoke a wider world. 

Her training as an Illustrator and skill in drawing has supported her through a diverse range of projects: installations for musical performance, educational projects in schools, as Artist in Residence at Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, more recently as a Garden Designer.    

Theatre credits include: Stuff Happens, A Little Night Music, The Sea, In Flame, King Lear, As You Like It, The Merchant of Venice (RADA), Mrs Roosevelt Flies to London (King’s Head and international tour), Peer Gynt, Mr Vertigo (North Wall), Islands (Lipsynch), The Oklahoma Outlaw (Northern Stage), Beautiful People (Scarborough), Doctor Faustus, The Accrington Pals (Chichester). 

She was a joint artistic director of The Table Show, designing Wanted Man (BAC), Coventry (National Theatre), Missing Reel (West Yorkshire Playhouse/Traverse)

Design for screen includes costumes for This Filthy Earth (Film 4), Something to Make You Sing, Market of the Dead (BBC TV), Tales from the Underground (MTV).  Design of music theatre includes Earth Receive an Honoured Guest (Hoxton New Music Days) and Red Herring at Wilton’s Music Hall. 

She has designed private and public gardens in London and East Anglia. 

 

Edward Kemp is a writer, director, dramaturg and translator.  Since 2008 he has been Director of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA).  Collaborations with Cathy Marston include Lady Chatterley’s Lover (Grands Ballets Canadiens), Les Liaisons Dangereuses (Royal Danish Ballet), Ghosts, Echo and Narcissus (ROH2), A Tale of Two Cities (Northern Ballet Theatre), Blood Wedding (Helsinki Ballet), Firebird, Juliet and Romeo, Wuthering Heights, Ein Winternachtstraum, Clara, Hexenhatz (Bern Ballet).  He has written text for Julian Philips’s How the Whale Became (ROH) and The Yellow Sofa (Glyndebourne), Victoria Borisova Ollas’s The Ground Beneath Her Feet (Manchester Festival), Jason Carr’s Six Pictures of Lee Miller (Chichester), Prokofiev’s Ivan the Terrible (BBC Proms). Plays and adaptations include: Racine’s Andromache (RADA/BBC Radio), Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita (Chichester/Complicite), King James Bible (National Theatre), Kleist’s Penthesilea, Goldoni’s Holiday Trilogy, Lorca’s House of Bernarda Alba (RADA), Brecht’s Turandot (Hampstead), 5/11 (Chichester), Lessing’s Nathan the Wise (Chichester/BBC Radio), WG Sebald’s The Emigrants (BBC Radio), Moliere’s Don Juan and The Hypochondriac (West Yorkshire Playhouse), Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying (Young Vic), The Mysteries (RSC/BBC Radio).  As a director, productions include Romeo & Juliet, Stuff Happens, A Little Night Music, Andromache, The Sea, Six Pictures of Lee Miller, King Lear, The Young Idea, Company, Penthesilea (RADA), Macbeth (Regent’s Park), Office Suite, Dr Faustus, Wild Orchids, Accrington Pals (Chichester), Beautiful People (Scarborough), As I Lay Dying (Louisiana), Mommsens Block, Doctor Faustus Lights the Lights (Vermont), Missing Reel, Wanted Man, Coventry (National Theatre Studio).  Future plans include new ballets with Cathy Marston for the Royal Ballet and San Francisco Ballet.

 

 

Composer and Pianist, Philip Feeney (b.1954), studied composition at the University of Cambridge with Robin Holloway and Hugh Wood, and later with Franco Donatoni in Rome at the Accademia di Santa Cecilia. He is best known for his work in dance, which he first encountered in Italy and has since worked with many companies, including Northern Ballet Theatre, Rambert Dance Company, the White Oak Project and the Martha Graham Company. He has collaborated with many choreographers including Michael Pink, Didy Veldman, Michael Keegan-Dolan, Derek Williams, David Nixon, Adam Cooper and Sara Matthews, and his works have been performed by dance companies as diverse as Northern Ballet Theatre, Rambert Dance Company, Cullberg Ballet, Boston Ballet, Fabulous Beast, Scottish Dance Theatre, Milwaukee Ballet, in addition to more than forty works for Ballet Central.

Clearly inspired by image and movement, Feeney’s output is remarkable, apart from anything else, for its range and scope. Extending from full-length orchestral ballet scores to electro-acoustic soundscapes, even to jazz and hip hop scores, his works exhibit a capacity for making style work for him, by reinventing past styles in a post-modern way. For him, the crucial thing is that music for dance needs to make sense as pure music at all times. It needs to have that kinetic musicality and parallel logic that makes one feel that the music is right, and that it is the only possible music that could work for that particular choreography.

From 1991-95 he lectured in composition at Reading University. He is currently composer in residence for Ballet Central and has been a longstanding accompanist at the London Contemporary Dance School.

 

For 45 years, San Francisco’s Kronos Quartet – David Harrington (violin), John Sherba (violin), Hank Dutt (viola), and Sunny Yang (cello) – has combined a spirit of fearless exploration with a commitment to continually reimagine the string quartet experience. In the process, Kronos has become one of the world’s most celebrated and influential ensembles, performing thousands of concerts, releasing more than 60 recordings, collaborating with an eclectic mix of composers and performers, and commissioning over 1000 works and arrangements for string quartet. The group has won over 40 awards, including two Grammys, the prestigious Polar Music and Avery Fisher Prizes, and the WOMEX (World Music Expo) Artist Award. The nonprofit Kronos Performing Arts Association manages all aspects of Kronos’ work, including the commissioning of new works, concert tours and home season performances, education programs, and the annual Kronos Festival. In 2015, Kronos launched 50 for the Future: The Kronos Learning Repertoire, an education and legacy project that is commissioning—and distributing online for free—50 new works for string quartet composed by 25 women and 25 men.

Of Trinidadian and British parents, Cassa trained at the Royal Academy of Dance, gaining a degree in classical ballet from Durham University. Upon graduating in 2001, she founded Ballet Black in order to provide role models to young, aspiring black and Asian dancers. A year later, she opened the BB Junior School in Shepherd’s Bush. Cassa is also a graduate of the 2009 National Theatre cultural leadership programme, Step Change. Since starting the Company, she has commissioned work from a wide range of choreographers, including Liam Scarlett, Richard Alston, Javier de Frutos, Annabelle Lopez- Ochoa, Shobana Jeyasingh, Henri Oguike, and Will Tuckett. Ballet Black won both the Critics’ Circle National Dance Award for Outstanding Company in 2009 and Best Independent Company in 2012. Cassa was awarded an MBE in the 2013 New Year Honours List for Services to Classical Ballet and has served as a judge on the panels of both the Kenneth Macmillan Choreographic and BBC Young Dancer competitions. In 2015, Cassa was appointed a Patron of Central School of Ballet and in May 2016 became a vice president of The London Ballet Circle. In 2017, she joined the Ballet Now consortium in association with Birmingham Royal Ballet and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (RSA). Also that year, Cassa, along with Senior Artist Cira Robinson, collaborated with renowned British ballet shoe manufacturer, Freed of London, to create two brand new pointe shoe colours to enable dancers of black descent to buy skin-tone pointe shoes ready-made. In 2018, Cassa was awarded the Freedom of the City of London. To date, she has commissioned 31 choreographers, to create over 45 new ballets for the Company. She also teaches regularly at the BB Junior School in Shepherd’s Bush, West London.

Cast
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José Alves

Senior Artist

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Isabela Coracy

Senior Artist

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Sayaka Ichikawa

Senior Artist

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Marie Astrid Mence

Junior Artist

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Mthuthuzeli November

Junior Artist

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Cira Robinson

Senior Artist

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Ebony Thomas

Second Year Apprentice

Born in Brazil, José started ballet at the age of 13 at the Adalgisa Rolim Ballet School. In 2007 he joined the Bolshoi Theatre School in Brazil and graduated in 2008. In 2010 he attended the Youth American Grand Prix in New York, where he was awarded a scholarship to train with the Royal New Zealand Ballet Company. When he was unable to raise the funds to travel to New Zealand, he joined the Ballet Company of the Young (Palace of Arts) in Belo, Brazil where he remained until 2011. During this time he was also the featured dancer in Ricky Martin’s music video, Samba. In 2012 he joined the Teatr Muzyczny w Łódz in Poland. José joined Ballet Black for the 2012/13 season and was promoted to Senior Artist in 2014. He has danced in original choreography by Javier de Frutos, Will Tuckett, Ludovic Ondiviela and created the roles of Demetrius and Bottom in A Dream Within a Midsummer Night’s Dream by Arthur Pita, and The Son in Mark Bruce’s Second Coming. José then joined Polski Teatr Tańca (Polish Dance Theatre) for a year before returning to Ballet Black in September 2016. In 2017, José was featured in the Company’s revival of Martin Lawrance’s Captured and created the role of Grandma, danced en pointe, in Annabelle Lopez-Ochoa’s Red Riding Hood. He was also one of the lead dancers in the Company’s first live stream on World Ballet Day 2017, dancing in the revival of Dopamine (you make my levels go silly) by Ludovic Ondiviela (2013), broadcast by the BBC. In 2018, José danced the role of Oberon in A Dream Within A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Arthur Pita) and created the role of Philemon in Cathy Marston’s The Suit, for which he won the 2018 Critics’ Circle National Dance Award for Outstanding Male Classical Dancer.

Isabela was born in Brazil and began her vocational training at the Centro De Dança Rio. She has taken part in many festivals and competitions, including the Joinville Festival and Youth America Grand Prix. As a professional, Isabela has danced with Project Deborah Colker, São Paulo Dance Company, Youth Ballet of Rio de Janeiro, Brazilian Company of Ballet and has toured Russia extensively. She has danced in many classics: Don Quixote, Raymonda, Swan Lake and Serenade, as well as modern works, Gnawa (Nacho Duato) and The Double (Mauricio de Oliveira). In 2009, Isabela was featured in the documentary, Only When I Dance, directed by Beaide Finzi. Isabela joined Ballet Black as a Junior Artist in 2013 and has since danced in works by Christopher Marney, Javier de Frutos and Martin Lawrance. In 2014, Isabela created the role of Puck in A Dream Within a Midsummer Night’s Dream by Arthur Pita and danced in Martin Lawrance’s ballet, Limbo. In 2015, she was promoted to Senior Artist and created the role of The Maiden in Mark Bruce’s production of Second Coming. In 2016 Isabela was featured in ballets by Christopher Marney and danced the role of Burlesque Dancer and Lulu White in Storyville by Christopher Hampson. In 2017 Isabela was a featured dancer in Martin Lawrance’s Captured and created the role of Mother in Red Riding Hood by Annabelle Lopez-Ochoa. In 2018, Isabela created roles in Cathy Marston’s The Suit and reprised her role as Puck in BB’s 2018 restaging of Dream.

Sayaka was born in Chiba, Japan, where she began dancing at the age of two. She trained in New York and in 2003 moved to London to study at the Rambert School of Ballet and Contemporary Dance. Sayaka graduated in 2006 with a First Class BA (Hons) degree. Since graduating, she has performed with Vienna Festival Ballet and Ballet Theatre UK as a Principal Dancer in Coppélia, Sleeping Beauty, The Nutcracker and Swan Lake and in 2009 performed Le Corsaire with American Ballet Theatre at the London Coliseum. Sayaka performed in Ross McKim’s Moving Visions Dance Theatre at St. Paul’s Cathedral in London and York Minster. She has also danced for English National Opera and Opera North in their production of Madam Butterfly. Sayaka appeared in the musical The King and I and in the film, StreetDance: the Movie. She has also been a Guest Principal Dancer and Guest Teacher for Ballet Riviera in Switzerland since 2008. Sayaka was a member of the Ballet Black Associate Programme for several years before becoming a Senior Artist with Ballet Black in 2011. Since joining the Company, Sayaka has been a featured dancer in ballets by Jonathan Watkins, Henri Oguike and Martin Lawrance. In 2014 she created the role of Helena in Arthur Pita’s production of A Dream Within a Midsummer Night’s Dream. After a year off to have her first child, Sayaka returned to Ballet Black for the 2015/16 season, where she danced in featured roles for Arthur Pita, Christopher Marney and as Lulu White in Christopher Hampson’s Storyville. In 2017, Sayaka was a featured dancer in the Michael Corder quartet, House of Dreams and danced the roles of Wolf Acolyte and Red in Annabelle Lopez-Ochoa’s Red Riding Hood. In 2018 she returned to the role of Helena in Dream, and danced the part of Matilda in The Suit. She was also one of the lead dancers in the Company’s first live stream on World Ballet Day 2017, dancing in the revival of Dopamine (you make my levels go silly) by Ludovic Ondiviela (2013), broadcast by the BBC. Alongside working for Ballet Black, Sayaka is currently studying for the Royal Ballet School’s Diploma of Dance Teaching.

Marie-Astrid was born in Paris, France where she began dancing at a private dance school before continuing to the Higher National Conservatory of Music and Dance in Paris. She was a member of the Junior Ballet of Paris and danced in works by Jiří Kylián, William Forsythe, Larry Keigwin, Christopher Hampson and Annabelle Lopez-Ochoa. She continued her training as a scholarship student at Alvin Ailey School in 2012 and was invited to dance in Revelations for Judith Jamison’s (Artistic Director of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre) birthday. Marie Astrid joined Ballet Black in September 2014 and performed the lead role of Anna in the children’s ballet, Dogs Don’t Do Ballet (Christopher Marney, 2014), the re-staging of Will Tuckett’s 2009 ballet, Depouillement, and Second Coming, created by Mark Bruce. In the summer of 2015, Marie joined Phoenix Dance Company and had the opportunity to dance in Tearfall and Melt by Artistic Director, Sharon Watson as well as Mapping (Darshan Singh Buller), Undivided Love (Kate Flatt) and Until Without Enough (Itzik Galili). Marie returned to Ballet Black in September 2016 and danced in new ballets by Christopher Marney and Christopher Hampson. In February 2017, Marie was Dancer of the Month in the British dance magazine, Dancing Times. She was also was one of the principal dancers in Michael Corder’s 2017 ballet, House of Dreams, and danced numerous parts in Annabelle Lopez- Ochoa’s Red Riding Hood. In 2018 Marie created roles in The Suit (Cathy Marston) and took on the role of Hermia in Dream.

Mthuthu was born in Cape Town, South Africa and started dancing at the age of 15 with the outreach programme, Dance For All. In 2011 he was awarded a scholarship to attend the Cape Academy of Performing Arts (CAPA), where He graduated with a Distinction in 2014. Mthuthu won a gold medal in the Contemporary category in the South Africa International Ballet Competition as a Junior in 2012, and as a senior in 2014. He has worked with Cape Dance Company under the direction of Debbie Turner, with choreographers including Bradley Shelver and Christopher Huggins. In 2015 he travelled to the UK to perform with Central School of Ballet’s third year touring company, Ballet Central, performing all over the country. Mthuthu is also a choreographer and has won an award for his first professional work “Calligraphy” for the Cape Dance Company 2 (CDC2). He danced in the production of West Side Story before joining BB as First Year Apprentice in September 2015 and was promoted to Junior Artist in 2016 where he created roles in Arthur Pita’s Cristaux and Christopher Hampson’s Storyville. He made his first ballet for BB, Interrupted in July 2016 and created his own choreographic platform, M22 Movement Lab, collaborating with musicians, composers and designers to create new choreography for stage and film. Mthuthu got an award as South Africa’s Emerging artist at the Klein Karoo Nasionale Kunstefees (KKNK) for his solo work. In 2017 he was a lead dancer in the revival of Martin Lawrance’s Captured, and created the role of The Wolf in Annabelle Lopez-Ochoa’s Red Riding Hood. In 2017, Mthuthu was commissioned by the Cape Dance Company to create a new work, funded by the National Arts Council of South Africa, which premiered at Artscape Theatre in Cape Town. In 2018, Mthuthu created a solo for Precious Adams of English National Ballet, for the Emerging Dancer competition.

Cira was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, where she began dancing at the age of eight. After graduating from the Performing Arts School in 2004, she moved to New York to dance full-time with the Dance Theater of Harlem. During her three years there, she performed at the White House for the President of the United States, as well as the Protégé Festival. In 2008, Cira travelled to the United Kingdom for the first time to join Ballet Black. In the summer that year, she danced with Ballet Identity in Los Angeles, before returning to Ballet Black in November. Since 2008, she has danced in Ballet Black commissions by Martin Lawrance, Richard Alston, Henri Oguike, Liam Scarlett and Robert Binet to name a few. She created the role of one of the Furies in Will Tuckett’s Orpheus (2011) and the lead role of Nola in Ballet Black’s production of Storyville, choreographed for BB by Christopher Hampson in 2012 and reprised the part in 2016. In 2013 she was featured in War Letters (Christopher Marney) and received her first nomination for Outstanding Classical dancer at the Critics’ Circle National Dance Awards in 2014. She also created the role of Titania in Arthur Pita’s Ballet Black production of A Dream Within a Midsummer Night’s Dream and The Serpent in Second Coming (choreographed by Mark Bruce). In 2016, she was a featured dancer in Arthur Pita’s Cristaux, and in 2017, was a lead dancer in the revival of Martin Lawrance’s Captured. She also created the role of Red in Red Riding Hood by Annabelle Lopez-Ochoa. In 2017, Cira, along with Company Founder, Cassa Pancho, collaborated with renowned British ballet shoe manufacturer, Freed of London, to create two brand new pointe shoe colours to enable dancers of black descent to buy skin-tone pointe shoes ready-made. These are now available to buy worldwide. In 2018, Cira reprised her part as Titania in Dream and created the role of Matilda in The Suit (Cathy Marston). She also teaches regularly at the Ballet Black Junior School and for the Yorkshire Ballet Summer School.

Ebony was born in London and started dancing at the age of 5 at the Kingston Ballet School run by Louise Jefferson. He joined The Royal Ballet School Junior Associates where he took classes for three years and was chosen to perform several times with The Royal Ballet Company. At the age of 11, he joined Elmhurst Ballet School where he had the opportunity to perform with Birmingham Royal Ballet, and is featured in the Royal Academy of Dance syllabus DVDs. Ebony has also danced overseas at the Virginia Arts Festival in the USA. He has performed a wide variety of repertoire, including David Bintley’s Argonauts, Sir Peter Wright’s Coppélia and the Don Quioxte pas de deux choreographed by Marius Petipa. He is delighted to be a member of Ballet Black, and since joining in 2017, has danced in ballets by Martin Lawrance, Annabelle Lopez-Ochoa and Arthur Pita, and created roles in The Suit by Cathy Marston.

Synopsis
Synopsis

Matilda and Philemon are married and live in Sophiatown, a suburb of Johannesburg. One morning, Philemon gets up as ever, going through his morning ritual, preparing breakfast in bed for Matilda before heading off to catch the bus to work. No sooner is Philemon on his way, than Simon, Matilda’s lover, comes into the house.

At the bus stop, Philemon realises he has left his briefcase behind. He returns home. There he discovers Matilda in bed with another man. Simon jumps out of the window, leaving behind his suit. Matilda begs Philemon for forgiveness. He tells her to take care of the Suit, takes his briefcase and goes to work.

At dinner that evening, Philemon insists that the Suit sits down to dinner with them and that Matilda must treat it as an honoured guest. That night Matilda cannot sleep, her dreams haunted by the Suit.

The following morning the daily ritual is played out, but now with the Suit as a guest. When they go for a walk in the park, Philemon insists the Suit accompanies them. In the park, Matilda is overcome with shame and tries to keep the Suit hidden from the eyes of passers-by.

Nearby a band strikes up and people start to dance. Matilda persuades Philemon to dance with her. For a moment it feels as though their marriage is as it was. But when the next dance begins Philemon insists that Matilda now dances with the Suit. She does so until she can bear it no longer and she runs back home.

At home she tries to destroy the Suit but finds she can’t. Philemon returns to find his wife dead. He is left alone with the Suit.

2019 New Commissions

Overview

The Grange Festival’s ballet committee has provided a NEW COMMISSION FUND for Dance@TheGrange, which offers a unique opportunity to create new dance works. Director of Dance, Wayne McGregor, is curating the first of these new commissions from two emerging ballet choreographers, that will premiere this June. 

 

WASHA:The Burn From The Inside

Performed by Ballet Black
Choreographer: Mthuthuzeli November

WASHA: The Burn From The Inside is a new abstract ballet created by Ballet Black Company dancer and choreographer Mthuthuzeli November. WASHA examines the power and impact music has on us, and how we express this in our own very unique and individual ways.

“For this work I am deeply inspired by the origin of music or where we think music and dance comes from. It started by asking – exactly why do we dance to music? What is it about music
that makes us feel the way we do when we listen to it? Very often we think music came or comes first, before movement. I myself as a choreographer used to think that, but when I think about it now it makes sense that movement inspired the creation of music. When we move or speak we create rhythm and as humans we have evolved through generations and generations to use these rhythms to communicate or to express emotions. Everything around us makes sound and we tend to like following sound or recreating the sounds around us to make music. We have evolved so much that we started creating complex rhythms and sounds; we enjoy being able to move in sync with one another. In Southern Africa the first known musicians were the San people. Their language is filled with unusual click sounds that produce a variety of musical sounds/instruments. I became fascinated with how African tribes use music to communicate or give thanks by creating rhythms and singing around a fire.” – Mthuthuzeli November

WASHA: The Burn From The Inside is a co-commission by Studio Wayne McGregor, Ballet Black and Dance@TheGrange

 

CLAY

Performed by Company Wayne McGregor
Choreographer: Alice Topp

‘This new duet for The Grange will form part of a larger work currently in progress. Clay will look at the way we alter and shift in the presence of pain and grief. The duet will explore a relationship dynamic based on living with someone you love that is suffering. When do their monsters start becoming yours? At what point do you start wearing their demons as your own? Like clay, we sometimes mould ourselves to fit another, in order to ease pain and suffering.’ – Alice Topp

Clay is a co-commission by Studio Wayne McGregor, The Australian Ballet and Dance@TheGrange

Production Team
See bio

Mthuthuzeli November

Choreographer | WASHA: The Burn From The Inside

See bio

David Plater

Lighting Designer | WASHA: The Burn From The Inside

See bio

Peter Johnson

Composer | WASHA: The Burn From The Inside

See bio

Alice Topp

Choreographer | Clay

See bio

Geneviève Giron

Lighting Design | Clay

See bio

Ludovico Einaudi

Music | Clay

Mthuthu was born in Cape Town, South Africa and started dancing at the age of 15 with the outreach programme, Dance For All. In 2011 he was awarded a scholarship to attend the Cape Academy of Performing Arts (CAPA), where He graduated with a Distinction in 2014. Mthuthu won a gold medal in the Contemporary category in the South Africa International Ballet Competition as a Junior in 2012, and as a senior in 2014. He has worked with Cape Dance Company under the direction of Debbie Turner, with choreographers including Bradley Shelver and Christopher Huggins. In 2015 he travelled to the UK to perform with Central School of Ballet’s third year touring company, Ballet Central, performing all over the country. Mthuthu is also a choreographer and has won an award for his first professional work “Calligraphy” for the Cape Dance Company 2 (CDC2). He danced in the production of West Side Story before joining BB as First Year Apprentice in September 2015 and was promoted to Junior Artist in 2016 where he created roles in Arthur Pita’s Cristaux and Christopher Hampson’s Storyville. He made his first ballet for BB, Interrupted in July 2016 and created his own choreographic platform, M22 Movement Lab, collaborating with musicians, composers and designers to create new choreography for stage and film. Mthuthu got an award as South Africa’s Emerging artist at the Klein Karoo Nasionale Kunstefees (KKNK) for his solo work. In 2017 he was a lead dancer in the revival of Martin Lawrance’s Captured, and created the role of The Wolf in Annabelle Lopez-Ochoa’s Red Riding Hood. In 2017, Mthuthu was commissioned by the Cape Dance Company to create a new work, funded by the National Arts Council of South Africa, which premiered at Artscape Theatre in Cape Town. In 2018, Mthuthu created a solo for Precious Adams of English National Ballet, for the Emerging Dancer competition.

David trained at RADA and was previously Head of Lighting at the Donmar Warehouse. He has been resident lighting designer for Ballet Black since 2001 lighting over forty dance commissions at the Linbury Theatre, Royal Opera House and Barbican, as well as all over the UK, Holland, Germany, Italy and Bermuda. David’s nominations for lighting design include: an Olivier, Tony and Drama Desk for Best Lighting Design for Bring Up The Bodies in Winter Gardens Broadway & Aldwych West End; a Knight of Illumination Award for Richard II (Best Lighting in a Play in 2012) and for This Is My Family (Best Lighting for a Musical) in 2013.

His designs include: The Mother (for Arthur Pita) The Mentalists, Wyndhams, The Effect, Sheffield Theatres, Terra, The Cocktail Party, Terra, Deathwatch, Lovely Sunday and Outside Blixen at the Coronet Notting Hill, Bring Up The Bodies Winter Garden Theatre, New York, Aldwych and RSC Swan. This Is My Family Sheffield Lyceum, Outside Mullingar Bath Ustinov, Brass Leeds City Varieties, The Glass Supper Hampstead, Billy Liar Manchester Royal Exchange, The Dishwashers Birmingham Rep. Richard III/Twelfth Night, Roger Rees: What You Will, 13 The Musical, Jason Robert Brown in Concert, (all at the Apollo, West End). Further work includes: Sondheim at 80 Queens West End, Michael Ball in Concert Haymarket West End. Dark Tales, Beautiful Thing Arts West End, Richard II, Four Quartets and Three Days of Rain, for the Donmar Warehouse, Loyal Women Royal Court Theatre, Macbeth Sheffield Crucible, Quiz Show Traverse Theatre, Mrs Lowry & Son, The Silence of the Sea, Stacy/Fanny & Faggot, for the Trafalgar Studios, The Chair Plays, Lyric Hammersmith, Arab–Israeli Cookbook, Tricycle Theatre, When We Are Married and A Passionate Woman at the York Theatre Royal, Dick Whittington, Beauty & The Beast, Robin Hood and Sinbad the Sailor for Theatre Royal Stratford East, and My Night with Reg and Dancing at Lughnasa for the New Vic Theatre in Stoke. In 2018, David was the recipient of the Knight of Illumination Award for Dance for his designs for The Suit (Cathy Marston/Ballet Black).

Peter Johnson is a South African based musician, composer and producer. Born in Cape Town, he began studying classical piano and tap dancing while at school. He later pursued his love for the piano and spent some time furthering his studies at the University of Cape Town under the guidance of Dr. Franklin Larey. It was during this time that he decided to broaden his dance studies joined the Cape Academy of Performing Arts, graduating in 2009 with a Diploma in Musical Theatre and Dance Related Studies. Peter was introduced to vocal studies, drama and dance genres such as ballet, contemporary, Spanish and various other dance techniques under the guidance of Debbie Turner and her faculty. He was privileged to have worked with South African choreographers such as Adele Blank, Ananda Fuchs, Sbonakaliso Ndaba and international choreographers such as Michael Thomas. As a self-taught composer learning all the technical aspects of digital music recording and production, Peter is actively involved in various projects and collaborations with artists and choreographers. In 2011 he composed the commissioned work for the Baxter Dance Festival. Ingoma is his third collaboration with Mthuthuzeli November. November’s Visceral and Sun, choreographed for the Cape Dance Company and composed by Johnson, have laid the foundation for the artistic vision each one has. He is always looking for new emotive and unique ways of expression in music.

Alice was born and raised in Bendigo, Victoria, Australia and started dancing at the age of four. She began her dance studies at a local school before attending the Victorian College of the Arts Secondary School for a year in 1998; she then undertook four years of full-time classical training at Ballet Theatre of Victoria. After two years with Royal New Zealand Ballet, Alice joined The Australian Ballet in 2007 and has danced in a wide range of classical and contemporary repertoire. She has performed in three works by Wayne McGregor: Infra, Chroma and Dyad 1929. Alice has a passion for choreography and has created four critically acclaimed works for the company’s Bodytorque seasons. In 2014 she choreographed an intimate pas de deux, performed by Rudy Hawkes and Vivienne Wong, for Megan Washington’s Begin Again music video; in 2016 her first mainstage work, Little Atlas, premiered at the Sydney Opera House as part of The Australian Ballet’s Symphony in C program. In 2017, she choreographed the music video for Ben Folds’ Capable of Anything, and was promoted to coryphée. In 2018 her work Aurum had its world premiere as part of The Australian Ballet’s Verve program; later that year, Alice became one of the company’s resident choreographers.

Geneviève grew up in Brittany, France. After studying English Literature and Arts Philosophy she started training professionally as a dancer and choreographer in Montpellier and Toulouse (France). She then moved to London and obtained a First Class BA (Hons) in Modern Theatre Dance. Whilst working as a Dance Artist Gene developed a growing interest in lighting design and theatre work which have now become her main activity. Her design experience includes work with choreographers such as Tara D’Arquian, Gary Clarke, Marie˗Gabrielle Rotie, Theo Lowe and Mathias Sperling, and with Dirty Market Theatre. She has worked as a technician in various venues in London including Trinity Laban, Greenwich Dance, Theatre Delicatessen, Goldsmiths University, Tate Modern and Southwark Playhouse. Past touring and relighting works include Retina Dance Company, Hagit Yakira Dance, Transitions Dance Company, Dance Research Studio, Tilted Productions and Rhiannon Faith. Geneviève joined Studio Wayne McGregor’s technical team in 2018.

His phenomenal CD sales and ability to sell out major concert halls worldwide are confirmation that Einaudi is one of classical music’s success stories. After studying at the Conservatory in Milan, and subsequently with Luciano Berio, he spent several years composing in traditional forms. In the mid-1980s he began to search for a more personal expression in a series of works for dance and multimedia, and later for piano. His music is ambient, meditative and often introspective, drawing on minimalism, world music and contemporary pop. He has made a significant impact in the film world, with four international awards to his name.

Overview

LITTLE ATLAS

Performed by Company Wayne McGregor
Choreographer: Alice Topp

“ Memory fades, memory adjusts, memory conforms to what we think we remember.” –Joan Didion, Blue Nights

“ Such things that disappear in time that we find ourselves longing to see again. We search for them in close-up, as we search for our hands in a dream.” – Patti Smith, M Train

 

‘Little Atlas is based around the notion of memories and our attempts to recreate or unmake them. It explores our connection to people and places of the past – in particular, our attachment to the way these things made us feel, whether they’re events that continue to plague us or places we return to for sanctuary. It’s as though we keep moments safe in our minds, the only place where long-lost pieces of the past can live on. Together we carry our memories – each a unique map of scars and stories imprinted on our brains – through the trinity of past, present and future, bringing ourselves both comfort and discomfort, burden and blessing.’ – Alice Topp

Little Atlas was commissioned and first produced by The Australian Ballet under the artistic directorship of David McAllister. Premiere: 29 April 2016 ,as part of the company’s Symphony in C season, Joan Sutherland Theatre, Sydney Opera House, Sydney, Australia

Production Team
See bio

Alice Topp

Choreographer | Little Atlas

See bio

Ludovico Einaudi

Music | Little Atlas

See bio

Jon Buswell

Lighting Design | Little Atlas

Alice was born and raised in Bendigo, Victoria, Australia and started dancing at the age of four. She began her dance studies at a local school before attending the Victorian College of the Arts Secondary School for a year in 1998; she then undertook four years of full-time classical training at Ballet Theatre of Victoria. After two years with Royal New Zealand Ballet, Alice joined The Australian Ballet in 2007 and has danced in a wide range of classical and contemporary repertoire. She has performed in three works by Wayne McGregor: Infra, Chroma and Dyad 1929. Alice has a passion for choreography and has created four critically acclaimed works for the company’s Bodytorque seasons. In 2014 she choreographed an intimate pas de deux, performed by Rudy Hawkes and Vivienne Wong, for Megan Washington’s Begin Again music video; in 2016 her first mainstage work, Little Atlas, premiered at the Sydney Opera House as part of The Australian Ballet’s Symphony in C program. In 2017, she choreographed the music video for Ben Folds’ Capable of Anything, and was promoted to coryphée. In 2018 her work Aurum had its world premiere as part of The Australian Ballet’s Verve program; later that year, Alice became one of the company’s resident choreographers.

His phenomenal CD sales and ability to sell out major concert halls worldwide are confirmation that Einaudi is one of classical music’s success stories. After studying at the Conservatory in Milan, and subsequently with Luciano Berio, he spent several years composing in traditional forms. In the mid-1980s he began to search for a more personal expression in a series of works for dance and multimedia, and later for piano. His music is ambient, meditative and often introspective, drawing on minimalism, world music and contemporary pop. He has made a significant impact in the film world, with four international awards to his name.